Shoulder Dislocation

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Quiz: Do You Understand Shoulder Dislocation?

Test your knowledge by answering the following questions:

Questions
True
False
1

In older patients, the main risk with a shoulder dislocation is having an associated rotator cuff tear.

Explanation:
In older patients, the main risk with a shoulder dislocation is having an associated rotator cuff tear, or developing a post-dislocation stiff or frozen shoulder because it’s been immobilized for too long.
2

If nobody on the field can put your dislocated shoulder back in place, you probably need to go to the emergency room.

Explanation:
If a team trainer or other healthcare professional isn't on the field to put a first-time dislocated shoulder into place, you’re likely going to have to go to the emergency department to get a physician to put it back in joint.
3

After a first-time dislocation, patients usually get an MRI before it gets put back into joint.

Explanation:
After a first-time dislocation, patients usually get X-rays before it gets put back into joint. Once it’s put back in joint, X-rays are typically repeated on the same day to make sure that there are no other associated fractures with the dislocation.
4

Surgery for a dislocated shoulder is usually an arthroscopic day procedure.

Explanation:
If you develop recurrent dislocations, the most common treatment is surgical reconstruction of the damaged tissues in the shoulder joint. This usually involves an arthroscopic day procedure, where the surgeon identifies the torn labrum or the torn ligaments are that have occurred with each shoulder dislocation.
5

You should regain your range of motion within the first three to six months and return to your sport after about nine months.

Explanation:
Most patients will benefit from physiotherapy to get their range of motion back, decrease pain and increase strength. You should regain your range of motion within the first two to three months and return to your sport after about six months.